Celandine Poppy

Stylophorum diphyllum

native


Other Names:
Wood Poppy, Woods-poppy


Celandine Poppy is an uncommon perennial native plant in Virginia. It grows to be about a foot-and-a-half tall, and it has bright yellow flowers. It is named after a European poppy called the Greater Celandine, which has similar flowers. The invasive species called the Lesser Celandine, which grows in Monticello Park, is in the buttercup family. The poppy family contains plants with a great deal of variation in color and shape. The seeds from some species are rich in protein, calcium, and carbohydrate, and they are frequently added to breads and cakes. Poppy seeds contain small amounts of morphine and codeine, and opium poppies are used in the production of analgesic opiates such as heroin. In Britain, people wear red plastic poppies each November as a symbol of remembrance for World War I.

Identification Tools

Illinois Wildflowers Missouri Botanical Garden Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Ranges

North America Virginia

Celandine Poppy flower
A Celandine Poppy flower

Celandine Poppy flower
A Celandine Poppy flower, bud, and leaves. An aphid is on the edge of the petal.

Celandine Poppy flower
Celandine Poppy leaves

Celandine Poppy flower
Celandine Poppy flower about to open

Celandine Poppy flower
Celandine Poppy in bloom

Celandine Poppy flower
Celandine Poppy in bloom

Celandine Poppy flower
Celandine Poppy in bloom

Celandine Poppy flower
Celandine Poppy fruit

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